Corticosteroid cream for hair loss

Even though topical corticosteroids such as creams or ointments are applied to the surface of the skin, they can still cause side effects . Long-term use or excessive use can lead to thinning of the skin, irritation, dryness, or changes in skin color. If your doctor recommends that you occlude your psoriasis areas -- wrapping them in plastic after applying a topical corticosteroid to boost the effect -- side effects may be more common. More serious side effects may occur with topical corticosteroids if used in high doses for prolonged periods. You may become resistant to the helpful effects of topical corticosteroids over time, too.

In a Phase 2 HPA clinical study [see Pharmacodynamics ], pharmacokinetics was evaluated in a subgroup of 12 adult subjects. On Day 8, blood was taken just prior to and at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 hours following the last application. Plasma concentration of halobetasol propionate was measureable in all subjects. Based on the geometric mean plasma concentrations at 12 hour post-application across time, steady-state was achieved by Day 8. The mean (±standard deviation) Cmax concentrations for ULTRAVATE lotion on Day 8 was ± pg/mL, with the corresponding median Tmax value of 3 hours (range 0 – 6 hours); mean area under the halobetasol propionate concentration versus time curve over the dosing interval (AUCτ) was 1632 ± 1147 pg•h/mL.

  • This cream is for external use only. Avoid contact with the eyes, the mouth, or intravaginally.
  • Patients under the age of 17 years, in diaper dermatitis and under occlusion.
  • Systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids has produced reversible hypothalamic - pituitary - adrenal (HPA) axis suppression, manifestations of Cushing's syndrome, hyperglycemia and glucosuria in some patients.
  • Conditions which augment systemic absorption include use over large surface areas, prolonged use and use under occlusive dressings.
  • Patients applying cream to a large surface area or to areas under occlusion should be evaluated periodically for evidence of HPA axis suppression.
  • If HPA axis suppression is noted, an attempt should be made to withdraw the drug, to reduce the frequency of application, or to substitute a less potent corticosteroid.
  • Recovery of HPA axis function is generally prompt upon discontinuation of topical corticosteroids.
  • The use of gentamicin may result in overgrowth of nonsusceptible organisms including fungi. If superinfection occurs during gentamicin therapy, the drug should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted.
  • Cross allergenicity among aminoglycosides has been demonstrated.
  • The possibility of cumulative toxicity should be considered if gentamicin is applied topically to large skin lesions or large areas of denuded skin in combination with systemic aminoglycoside therapy.
  • Pregnancy: There are no adequate and well controlled studies of the teratogenic potential of topically applied corticosteroids in pregnant women. Therefore topical steroids should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the foetus. The drug should not be used on extensive areas, in large amounts or for prolonged periods in pregnant women.
  • Lactation: Since it is not known whether topical administration of corticosteroids can result in sufficient systemic absorption to produce detectable quantities in breast milk, a decision should be made to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.
  • Effects on ability to drive and use machines: None stated.

     

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
Indication : TRI‐LUMA ® Cream is indicated for the short‐term (up to 8 weeks) treatment of moderate to severe melasma of the face in the presence of measures for sun avoidance, including the use of sunscreens. Adverse Events : In the controlled clinical trials, the most frequently reported events were redness, peeling, burning, dryness, and itching at the site of application. Warnings/Precautions : TRI‐LUMA contains sulfites which may cause severe, life‐threatening allergic reactions in people allergic to sulfites. TRI‐LUMA contains hydroquinone, which may cause a gradual blue‐black darkening of the skin. If you are pregnant, nursing or trying to become pregnant you should not use TRI‐LUMA. Safety and efficacy have not been established in individuals with darker skin. Reversible HPA axis (adrenal function) suppression may result from exposure to the topical corticosteroid, fluocinolone acetonide, so discontinue use if signs and symptoms of this condition occur. Avoid products that may dry or irritate the skin, such as abrasive cleansers, scrubs, or skin‐peeling agents. Exposure to sunlight, sunlamps, or UV light and extreme heat, wind, or cold should be avoided. If exposure cannot be avoided, sunscreen products [SPF 30 or more] and protective apparel should be used.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit /medwatch , or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Corticosteroid cream for hair loss

corticosteroid cream for hair loss

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
Indication : TRI‐LUMA ® Cream is indicated for the short‐term (up to 8 weeks) treatment of moderate to severe melasma of the face in the presence of measures for sun avoidance, including the use of sunscreens. Adverse Events : In the controlled clinical trials, the most frequently reported events were redness, peeling, burning, dryness, and itching at the site of application. Warnings/Precautions : TRI‐LUMA contains sulfites which may cause severe, life‐threatening allergic reactions in people allergic to sulfites. TRI‐LUMA contains hydroquinone, which may cause a gradual blue‐black darkening of the skin. If you are pregnant, nursing or trying to become pregnant you should not use TRI‐LUMA. Safety and efficacy have not been established in individuals with darker skin. Reversible HPA axis (adrenal function) suppression may result from exposure to the topical corticosteroid, fluocinolone acetonide, so discontinue use if signs and symptoms of this condition occur. Avoid products that may dry or irritate the skin, such as abrasive cleansers, scrubs, or skin‐peeling agents. Exposure to sunlight, sunlamps, or UV light and extreme heat, wind, or cold should be avoided. If exposure cannot be avoided, sunscreen products [SPF 30 or more] and protective apparel should be used.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit /medwatch , or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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