Trigger finger steroid injection treatment

This illustration shows the tendon sheath, and shows how it has some thicker regions that are divided into named structures called pulleys. The A1 region is the one that gets involved in trigger finger. There is a similar division, but much simpler, in the thumb. The purpose of the pulleys is to keep the tendons close to the bone (see the smaller illustration above, to the left). As the finger bends (flexes), the pulleys prevent the tendons from sagging away from the bone. In trigger finger, there is some swelling of the tendon, due to a variety of factors, mostly processes of aging. The swollen part of the tendon "pops" under the A1 pulley, causing the finger to "pop" or not bend smoothly. Often the patient thinks it is the joint that is popping, but it is the tendon that moves that joint that is popping.

Trigger finger/thumb occurs when the pulley at the base of the finger becomes too thick and constricting around the tendon, making it hard for the tendon to move freely through the pulley. Sometimes the tendon develops a nodule (knot) or swelling of its lining. Because of the increased resistance to the gliding of the tendon through the pulley, one may feel pain, popping, or a catching feeling in the finger or thumb. When the tendon catches, it produces irritation and more swelling of the pulley. This causes a vicious cycle of triggering and thickening of the pulley. Sometimes the finger becomes stuck or locked, and is hard to straighten or bend. Causes for this condition are not always clear. Some trigger fingers are associated with medical conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, and diabetes.

To diagnose trigger finger, a doctor will perform a physical examination and discuss the symptoms. This may include feeling for lumps in the palm, checking for how smooth mobility is in the affected finger, and looking for areas of pain. Usually a physical exam is enough to make a diagnosis, however, further tests to determine any underlying conditions, such as arthritis, may be used. This may include blood tests to look for certain indicators of underlying conditions or magnetic resonance imaging to see the structure of the finger or hand.

Trigger finger (also called stenosing tenosynovitis) occurs when inflammation builds up within a tendon of a finger and causes it to involuntarily flex. [1] If the condition is severe, the finger gets stuck in a bent position and sometimes makes a snapping sound when forcibly straightened -- sort of like cocking the trigger of a gun, which explains the name. People whose job requires repetitive gripping are at higher risk of developing trigger finger, as are those with arthritis or diabetes. The treatment varies depending on severity and cause, which is why an accurate diagnosis is important.

Trigger finger steroid injection treatment

trigger finger steroid injection treatment

Trigger finger (also called stenosing tenosynovitis) occurs when inflammation builds up within a tendon of a finger and causes it to involuntarily flex. [1] If the condition is severe, the finger gets stuck in a bent position and sometimes makes a snapping sound when forcibly straightened -- sort of like cocking the trigger of a gun, which explains the name. People whose job requires repetitive gripping are at higher risk of developing trigger finger, as are those with arthritis or diabetes. The treatment varies depending on severity and cause, which is why an accurate diagnosis is important.

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